Friday, 23 August 2013

Major Craft Shore Jigging


Spring low tide and crystal clear conditions have never been very productive at the particular mark I was fishing during the week. I had a theory that the fish were holding out in the deeper waters, around some kelp beds, out of the range of usual lure tactics. Seemed a good opportunity to test out one of the two new Majorcraft shore jigging rods rods that I recently got hold of.

The rods in question are the Majorcraft KG Evolution KGS-1002MH 10’ 20-40g and the Majorcraft KG Evolution KGS -1062H 10’6 40-80g These rods are not subtle, with large foam handles, and some real power in the blank. Designed really for hard fighting Pelagic fish, I wanted to try out the shore jigging styles, and maybe adapt them for the Bass in UK waters.




So armed with the heavier rod of the two, I paired it up with a Shimano Stella 5000SW, spooled with some Sunline Momentum 4x4 30lb braid. This line has the strength to withstand casting heavy metal jigs, whilst maintaining a thin diameter, to enable true distance casting. The lure I was using throughout this session was a 65g metal jig, rigged with both a treble on the rear, and a assist hook on the front. 

Within the first few casts, it was immediately apparent that fishing at distance was no problem for this set up. The metal jig flying through the air for some time before making it's splash down. The benefits of a 5000 size reel or bigger comes to light, as meters and meters peel off the spool. Letting the lure sink down through the water, then working it back to shore. I tried a few different styles of retrieve, from the fast jigging style, pumping and winding the reel, to the more traditional slower sink and draw. The first fish to be landed were some decent sized Gar, which were flanked by more Gar as they came in. Then it was into the Mackerel, mostly taking the lure hard on the drop off the cast. The Mackerel were real beasts, biggest I have had this Summer, thick and long.



In amongst the Mackerel shoals, I found a couple of Bass lurking. First one felt like a good size, heavy fight, trying to take me into the thick kelp beds. As the fish came in, it was then I realised I had a double hook up on the metal jig, with a Mackerel on the treble, and a Bass on the front assist. Not sure if the Mackerel was hooked first, and the Bass went in for the easy target! Following that, another Bass was landed, again taking the lure at distance in the deeper waters. As the tide began to push hard, I finished the session by landing numerous small Pollack, that were really going for the lure, when worked fast and hard.




First impressions of the rod were good, definitely a tool for distance when required. I was glad to find the fish, holding out in the deeper water, as under these conditions I have blanked before, using set ups that did not allow access to the far out features. Hopefully I will have a good session with the lighter rated jigging rod when I get round to trying it out soon.


16 comments:

  1. This pictures show how dedicated you are to catch like this kind of fish.. very great and awesome. greetings from US Coast Guard License Training Alaska Waters Consulting

    ReplyDelete
  2. Very awesome you've got some unique kind of fishes.. ihope i can catch like that someday. Alaska Fly Fishing Shop 3 Rivers Fly & Tackle MIke Hudson

    ReplyDelete
  3. fast jigging style, pumping and winding the reel, to the more traditional slower sink and draw.

    ReplyDelete
  4. a good session with the lighter rated jigging rod when I get round to trying it out soon.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I haven't tried offshore fishing. i think ill do that with my buddies to tag along.

    ReplyDelete
  6. This photographs indicate exactly how focused you happen to be to hook such as this sort of fish.. really excellent along with amazing.
    fishing hooks

    ReplyDelete
  7. mmediately apparent that fishing at distance was no problem for this set up.

    ReplyDelete